Editorial: Keep your dog out of our space

We love your dog, but not when its canines are buried in our leg. That has been the unfortunate trend as of late, with two dog attacks reported in last Thursday’s issue of this newspaper. The solution, of course, is for pet owners to follow the law, which calls for no dogs to go unrestrained within the city limits.

Specifically, city of Uvalde ordinance Title 6 calls for pet animals to be confined in an appropriate fenced area: physical or electronic, indoors, on a leash or tethered. Rope or cable tethers must be no shorter than 15 feet in length. Tethering with chains is not allowed, and owners are responsible for keeping animals free of entanglement and for providing them with shelter and shade.

In one of the attacks referenced in our recent story, a dog escaped a fenced yard and bit a woman who was walking her dogs in an alley between Barry Street and Studer Street. The other incident involved a man being bitten by dogs that had gotten out of a neighboring property. In neither case did the pet owners receive a citation but the offending animals were placed in quarantine for 10 days.

The victims were adults but it is not hard to imagine what can happen when a child is involved. Many will remember the fatal 2013 dog attack on a 2-year-old boy in Sabinal. The child chased a balloon into a neighbor’s yard where a pit bull that was chained was still able to seize the little boy. There was no fence around the yard where the dog was kept.

It can’t be a good feeling to know that your dog has bitten someone, but imagine the horror of having the serious injury or death of a child on your conscience? All because you either failed to obey the confinement law or kept an animal that was a potential danger to others.

Not only do humans suffer under these circumstances, but the pets that might normally have been well-behaved while correctly restrained are placed in circumstances that could result in their own deaths.

One other thought: Perhaps pet owners should always receive a citation/fine if their animals are identified in cases of dog bite. That threat might help tip the owners, if not their animals, toward obedience.



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