Most locals have not completed Census

Julye Keeble

Staff writer

Though workers have been delayed from visiting homes in person due to the pandemic, the 2020 Census is still being conducted, and responding to the questionnaire is vitally important as the data provided by the census helps allocate federal funding within Uvalde County.

As of May 28, 30.7 percent of households in Uvalde County have responded to the census, with 16.7 percent of those responses submitted online. This is the first year census replies have been able to be submitted over the internet at www.my2020census.gov.

In the city of Uvalde, 47.5 percent of residents have responded with 22.3 percent of those responses submitted online.

The Uvalde County Complete Count Committee has been working since January to convey the importance of census participation to residents and has a goal of reaching at least an 80 percent response rate.

The complete count committee was formed to help promote the 2020 Census and consists of representatives from city and county government, media, health care facilities, county branches of federal government offices, educational facilities and more.

Those who have not yet submitted a response are encouraged to reply via mail, telephone or online.

The national response rate is 60.2 percent, with 54.9 percent of homes in the state of Texas submitting responses. About 45.1 percent of responses in Texas have been submitted online.

Response rates varied in proximate counties. In Kinney County, 5 percent of households have responded; in Edwards County, 4.9 percent; Maverick County, 42.3 percent; Frio County, 35.3 percent; Medina County, 42.8 percent; Real County, 6.4 percent; Val Verde County, 45.1 percent; and Zavala County, 28.2 percent.

During the 2010 census, the state of Texas had a final self-response rate of 64.4 percent; in Uvalde County 72.1 percent of households self-responded and the remaining 27.9 required in-person follow-up, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

The census was mandated by the United States Constitution in Article 1, Section 2, and the U.S. has counted its population every 10 years since 1790.

The data collected helps determine items such as how much federal funding makes its way into communities, and anyone living in the U.S. is required by law to be counted in the census.

The U.S. Census Bureau is bound by law to protect your answers and keep them strictly confidential. The law ensures that your private information is never published and that your answers cannot be used against you by any government agency or court.



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